Vlad Ropotan, our award winning wartime corespondent reports directly from Britain on how the homefront delt with the War!

Read About The Causes Of World War II

The major causes of World War ll were many. They included the impact of Treaty of Versailles following by World War l. The worldwide economic depression, the rise of militarism in Germany and Japan and the failure of the League of Nations

Rationing was introduced in 1938 because the government felt that WW2 would start shortly!

Rationing was introduced in 1938 because the government felt that WW2 would start shortly. Rationing is a means of making sure the fair distribution of food and commodities when they were scarce. Most foods were covered by the rationing system except for fruit and vegetables.

Before the War Britan imported around 55 million tons of food the rationing lasted for 14 year’s it ended on July 4th, 1954, everybody in Britan was given a rationing book and they had to register what they bought, and the shop keeper would cross from their book, if the pupil witch bought the item returns and ask's for the item that she or he bought they would have had to wait a very long time.

Most things were rationed until 1945 because all the ships had been blown up by torpedo’s on the crossing over to England. Engineers had to build new ones rapidly so we were able to import foreign foods, especially bananas, I never saw one of them for years on ends, I got a few oranges occasionally, form the few ships that did make it over here. But meat was rationed until 1964.

Most things were rationed until 1945 because all the ships had been blown up by torpedo’s on the crossing over to England. Engineers had to build new ones rapidly so we were able to import foreign foods, especially bananas, I never saw one of them for years on ends, I got a few oranges occasionally, form the few ships that did make it over here. But meat was rationed until 1964.

We interviewed some people and Annabella Souleater was told, "How was it like to have to bring your rationing book everywhere you wanted to buy something ? And the response we received was the following, " It was very hard to not forget and if I wanted to buy anything that was already crossed out I had to wait a lot and if I ran out of supplies I couldn't buy it if it was ticked off my rationing book.

The Ministry of Food wanted people to waste less food and to grow their own. This would also help them cope with rationing. This campaign urged people to use any spare land to grow vegetables. Parks, golf clubs and, more notably, the moat at the Tower of London were used. By 1943, there were 3.5 million allotments in Britain and over a million tonnes of vegetables were produced.

Items

Meat (March 1940) | Fish |Cheese | (May 1941)

Tinned Tomatoes (February 1942 | Rice (Jan 1942)

Jam (March 1941) | Tea (July 1940) | Eggs (June 1941)

Peas (February 1942) | Canned Fruit | Biscuits (August 1942)

Breakfast Cereals | Milk | Dried Fruit (January 1942)

Cooking Fat (July 1940)


The Home Guardian was an armed citizen supporting the British Army during the Second World War!

The Home Guardian was an armed citizen supporting the British Army during the Second World War. The Home Guards were try to slow down the advance of the enemy even by a couple of hours to give the regular troops time to regroup.

The Blitz was the name given to the bombing raids that Germany launched against Britain in 1940. The Blitz, Happened, September 7, 1940 to May 11, 194, intense bombing campaign undertaken by Nazi Germany against the United Kingdom during World War II. For eight months the Luftwaffe dropped bombs on London and other strategic cities across Britain.

In order to prevent Britain from being ‘starved out’ more than 80,000 women joined the Women’s Land Army, enduring extremely hard conditions and long hours in isolated rural outposts. Meanwhile back in the cities, the Women’s Voluntary Service prided itself on doing whatever was needed mainly providing support to victims of the Blitz and those sheltering from enemy bombing raids in underground stations. Their success in mobilizing economic output was also a major factor in supporting combat operations.

British men, women and children for the most part endured extreme hardship and distress in one form or another. Few people escaped the rigors of life in wartime Britain and only survived due to their extraordinary spirit, tenacity, determination and courage. Women were mobilised to an unprecedented degree on the Home Front, fighting the daily battle of rationing, recycling, reusing, and cultivating food in allotments and gardens.

For 8 months German planes dropped bombs on London and other cities, Birmingham, Coventry, Sheffield, Liverpool, Plymouth, Southampton, Portsmouth, and Manchester. These were all places where factories and other important industries were based. The attack was Adolf Hitler’s attempt at forcing the country to surrender.

Life on the Home Front played an important part of the war effort for all involved and had a positive impact on the outcome of the war. The British Government became involved with a raft of new issues, new policy making, complete reviews and overhauls of the policing, fire and ambulance services, transport, communications, internment of aliens, food production and rationing, manpower allocation, home defence, child evacuation and planning for the frightening possibility of occupation by the enemy. Britan started to prepare for WW2 1 year before it has started.


Learn All Aboud D-Day And What Happened

Britain and America were fighting Germany who controlled almost all of Europe, including France it was the biggest invasion in History. The British, America, French and Canada fought against Germany in Normandy(France).


Learn All About The Amazing Leaders Of Britan And Their Amazing Battles

In August 1942 Prime Minister Winston Churchill appointed him commander of the British Eighth Army in North Africa, which had recently been defeated and pushed back to Egypt by German General Erwin rommel. There Montgomery restored the troops’ shaken confidence and, combining drive with caution, forced Rommel to retreat from Egypt after the Battle of El-Alamein (November 1942). Montgomery then pursued the German armies across North Africa to their final surrender in Tunisia in May 1943. 

 

The Ministry of Information has made some very good artists to produce some propaganda posters. The focused of these posters was to demoralise and tell people some specific information!

The Ministry of Information has made some very good artists to produce some propaganda posters. The focused of these posters was to demoralise and tell people some specific information. By the end of World War 2, 300 people worked in the ministry. Posters ranged from ones emphasising bravery and togetherness, the images encouraging men to sign up to fight and for women to work in munitions factories to join the war effort.

In Britan propaganda is the, ideas, facts, or allegations spread usually to further one's cause or to damage an opposing cause. During World War II, Propaganda was a driving force that kept the battles heated and each nation's population united for a common cause.

Posters were tactically designed to promote the war effort. For example, housewives were instructed to do bad things instead of purchasing new items, and that careful use of food could help defeat Hitler.

However, in Germany propaganda was used differently. The essence of propaganda consists in winning people over to an idea so sincerely, so vitally, that in the end they succumb to it utterly and can never again escape from it," wrote Joseph Goebbels in his diary. Adolph Hitler agreed. Following the Nazis' rise to power in 1933. It played a key role in WW2 as both the Allied and the Axis used propaganda to influence and shape the public. Propaganda was used to decrees the moral (happiness) of people. Adolf Hittler used propaganda posters to show himself surrounded with fans and citizens to show what a good leader he was.

As so many men were called up to serve, Britain depended on women to carry out much of the war work. Some jobs were protected occupations meaning the men doing them were exempt from being called up to join the army

As so many men were called up to serve, Britain depended on women to carry out much of the war work. Some jobs were protected occupations meaning the men doing them were exempt from being called up to join the army

Life in early 1940s was dominated by the war and living conditions reflected this. The British Government was worried that the civilian population would suffer a huge casualty from enemy bombing attacks.

To avoid showing any light and attracting enemy bombers, the streets, and houses hat to be blacked out, the blackout began on 1 September 1939. All houses and streets had to be blacked out at night. Thousands of people died in road accidents. The number of road accidents increased because of the lack of street lighting and the dimmed traffic lights. To help prevent accidents white stripes were painted on the roads and on lamp-posts. People were encouraged to walk facing the traffic and men were advised to leave their shirt-tails hanging out so that they could be seen by cars with dimmed headlights. Other people were injured during the Blackout because they could not see in the darkness. Many people were injured tripping up, falling down steps, or bumping into things.

The blackout caused an increase in road traffic accidents and personal injuries. People were encouraged to wear something white such as a glove or badge so that they could be spotted. Fougasse was the pen name of Cyril Kenneth Bird, a cartoonist for Punch and illustrator for London. He offered his services to the Ministry of Information to design this poster free of charge, believing humour could unite British people in joint action.

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